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Culture Reflected in Writing https://www.pinterest.com/pin/413416440789862404/visual-search/?x=16&y=16&w=530&h=671

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1N0p0PLRF9mntQ6Nvi5yoh-ZKTQsve3vXZ76U_FD5PXg/edit?usp=sharing

This post relates to our class by discussing how technology has changed writing and how language has evolved. The user “rale” starts off this thread by sharing their realization that this generation has created a new way for how we write online. I have experienced this while scrolling through blog posts and YouTube comments. I am able to understand the point the user is trying to make by their use of misspelled words, capitalization, and incorrect grammar. This is because I grew up with the Internet and have gradually picked up on the connotations certain “mistakes”. I have even used “incorrect English” in my everyday life when texting friends. As “rale” addresses, this way of communication allows people to convey sarcasm and irony that otherwise would be difficult without being face-to-face. Using proper English could not express these things so a whole generation decided to make a revolutionary new way to do so.

 

“Maskedlinguist” replies by voicing their frustration of the media’s portrayal of this form of communication. I share the same sentiment because the media tries to belittle it by deeming it “lazy” and “uneducated”. I believe they do this because most of them did not grow up with the Internet and are not active enough on social media to understand the complexity behind it. “Maskedlinguist” gives an example of how minor changes in a sentence using improper English can warp the meaning of it. “Because there are Rules okay” takes on a more aggressive tone and emphasizes the importance of the rules compared to the sentence “there are rules”.       

 

To wrap up this post, “diabolical-mastermind” points out how their teacher was fascinated by how her students were “native speakers” of this new type of English which highlights how culture responds to technology, changes writing, and shapes language.  

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